Hildegard von Bingen
  • introduction

    Teaching the ideas and arguments of women philosophers is essential. Philosophy lecturers are multipliers. It is their task to implement gender equality by addressing the ideas of the women philosophers, too. The mediation of these ideas promotes a correct and holistic picture of the world, because the ideas from past centuries influence our lives today. In this context, the anthropological and bioethical topics are fundamental. So it is crucial that students know the ideas and arguments of women philosophers to make it easier for you to navigate in a pluralistic world. This is also essential for the development and identity of your personality. It is vital to recognize the intellectual achievements of women since our current understanding of the history and culture of philosophy is a male dominated and orientated one.
    This project aims at outlining anthropological and bioethical aspects in the philosophy of Hildegard von Bingen, making Hildegard’s rich corpus accessible to students of philosophy, and implementing her philosophical ideas into the philosophy curricula.


  • Philosopher's Profile

    Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), the prodigy of the 12th century, was a writer, composer, doctor, Benedictine abbess, and – not least – philosopher. Born in 1098, at the turn of the century, presumable in Bermersheim vor der Höhe, Hildegard is probably most famous for her three visionary volumes (Liber) Scivias – Know the Ways (1141-1151), Liber vitae meritorum – Book of the Rewards of Life (1158-1163), and Liber Divinorum Operum – Book of Divine Works (1163-1173/4). The first visionary work, (Liber) Scivias, consists of 26 visions that describe the image of the world, mankind, and God; starting from Genesis to the resurrection within the dualism of good and evil. In the Liber vitae meritorum, the second visionary work, moral conflict situations illustrate the sense of life, the impact of people’s decisions on and their responsibility for their way of life. Virtues like humility and vices as pride are represented allegorically and interact dichotomously within moral conflict situations. The third and final visionary volume, Liber Divinorum Operum, is again located in the field of philosophy of religion and metaphysics. In 13 visions the world and the (micro- / macro-) cosmos is set in relation to man and the Trinity doctrine. In the 1150s Hildegard worked on her medical and scientific writings: Causae et curae (= Liber compositae medicinae) and Physica (= Liber simplicis medicinae). Causae et curae explores the causes and cures of illnesses in six books, whereas Physica consists of nine books that list almost a thousand plants and animals and describes their physical and medical properties. It is assumed that both works originally derived from one work Liber subtilitatum diversarum naturam creaturam. Single passages in Causae et curae correspond to several in Physica. Although Physica is build up like typical medieval texts of this genre, it was written under a specific, empiricism-oriented medical perspective focusing on applied sciences.

    After dedicating her life time to exploring the worldly and heavenly sphere, Hildegard died in Bingen am Rhein on September 17, 1179.

  • Project: Anthropology and Bioethics in the works of Hildegard von Bingen
    by Julia Lerius

    Apart from a few scientifically substantiated publications and a number of popular-scientific literatures on the universal scholar Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), the innovative impact of her medical and scientific writings and the anthropological assumption made in her visionary trilogy has so far not been sufficiently investigated for today’s use in the philosophy classroom. This project addresses this issue and focuses on anthropological as well as bioethical aspects in Hildegard’s visionary writings, natural philosophy sources, and her medical works. The main aim of this project is to make Hildegard’s rich corpus accessible to students of philosophy and implement her philosophical ideas into the philosophy curricula. From the huge variety of her opus, parts of Hildegard’s Scivias, Liber vitae meritorum, Liber divinorum operum, Causae et curae and Physica are examined.

  • Bibliography

    Primary sources:

    Hildegard & Carlevaris, Angela (ed.) 1995. Hildegardis Liber vite meritorum, Turnhout: Brepols. (Corpvs Christianorvm Continuatio mediaeualis, Bd. 92).

    Hildegard & Führkötter, Adelgundis (ed.) 1978. Hildegardis Scivias. Scholars version. Turnholti: Brepols. (Corpvs Christianorvm Continuatio mediaeualis, Bd. 43/43A).

    Hildegard & Moulinier, Laurence (ed.) 2003. Beate Hildegardis Cause et cure. Berlin: Akademie-Verl. (Rarissima mediaevalia Opera latina, 1).

    Hildegard 2010. Physica: Liber subtilitatum diversarum naturarum creaturarum. Textkrit. Ausg. Berlin: de Gruyter.

    Hildegard, Derolez, Albert & Dronke, Peter (eds.) 1996. Hildegardis Bingensis Liber divinorum operum, Turnhout: Brepols. (Corpvs Christianorvm Continuatio mediaeualis, Bd. 92).

     

    Secondary sources:

    Please find a thoroughly researched Hildegard bibliography (incl. the anniversary year 1998) here:

    Lauter, Werner & Aris, Marc-Aeilko (Hg.) 1998. Hildegard von Bingen: Internationale wissenschaftliche Bibliographie; unter Verwendung der Hildegard-Bibliographie von Werner Lauter. Mainz: Selbstverl. der Ges. für Mittelrheinische Kirchengeschichte. (Quellen und Abhandlungen zur mittelrheinischen Kirchengeschichte, Bd. 84).

     

    A selection of secondary sources published since 1999 is provided here:

    Selected Bibliography – Hildegard von Bingen – Monographs since 1999

  • Links
  • introduction

    Teaching the ideas and arguments of women philosophers is essential. Philosophy lecturers are multipliers. It is their task to implement gender equality by addressing the ideas of the women philosophers, too. The mediation of these ideas promotes a correct and holistic picture of the world, because the ideas from past centuries influence our lives today. In this context, the anthropological and bioethical topics are fundamental. So it is crucial that students know the ideas and arguments of women philosophers to make it easier for you to navigate in a pluralistic world. This is also essential for the development and identity of your personality. It is vital to recognize the intellectual achievements of women since our current understanding of the history and culture of philosophy is a male dominated and orientated one.
    This project aims at outlining anthropological and bioethical aspects in the philosophy of Hildegard von Bingen, making Hildegard’s rich corpus accessible to students of philosophy, and implementing her philosophical ideas into the philosophy curricula.


  • Philosopher's Profile

    Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), the prodigy of the 12th century, was a writer, composer, doctor, Benedictine abbess, and – not least – philosopher. Born in 1098, at the turn of the century, presumable in Bermersheim vor der Höhe, Hildegard is probably most famous for her three visionary volumes (Liber) Scivias – Know the Ways (1141-1151), Liber vitae meritorum – Book of the Rewards of Life (1158-1163), and Liber Divinorum Operum – Book of Divine Works (1163-1173/4). The first visionary work, (Liber) Scivias, consists of 26 visions that describe the image of the world, mankind, and God; starting from Genesis to the resurrection within the dualism of good and evil. In the Liber vitae meritorum, the second visionary work, moral conflict situations illustrate the sense of life, the impact of people’s decisions on and their responsibility for their way of life. Virtues like humility and vices as pride are represented allegorically and interact dichotomously within moral conflict situations. The third and final visionary volume, Liber Divinorum Operum, is again located in the field of philosophy of religion and metaphysics. In 13 visions the world and the (micro- / macro-) cosmos is set in relation to man and the Trinity doctrine. In the 1150s Hildegard worked on her medical and scientific writings: Causae et curae (= Liber compositae medicinae) and Physica (= Liber simplicis medicinae). Causae et curae explores the causes and cures of illnesses in six books, whereas Physica consists of nine books that list almost a thousand plants and animals and describes their physical and medical properties. It is assumed that both works originally derived from one work Liber subtilitatum diversarum naturam creaturam. Single passages in Causae et curae correspond to several in Physica. Although Physica is build up like typical medieval texts of this genre, it was written under a specific, empiricism-oriented medical perspective focusing on applied sciences.

    After dedicating her life time to exploring the worldly and heavenly sphere, Hildegard died in Bingen am Rhein on September 17, 1179.

  • Project: Anthropology and Bioethics in the works of Hildegard von Bingen
    by Julia Lerius

    Apart from a few scientifically substantiated publications and a number of popular-scientific literatures on the universal scholar Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), the innovative impact of her medical and scientific writings and the anthropological assumption made in her visionary trilogy has so far not been sufficiently investigated for today’s use in the philosophy classroom. This project addresses this issue and focuses on anthropological as well as bioethical aspects in Hildegard’s visionary writings, natural philosophy sources, and her medical works. The main aim of this project is to make Hildegard’s rich corpus accessible to students of philosophy and implement her philosophical ideas into the philosophy curricula. From the huge variety of her opus, parts of Hildegard’s Scivias, Liber vitae meritorum, Liber divinorum operum, Causae et curae and Physica are examined.

  • Bibliography

    Primary sources:

    Hildegard & Carlevaris, Angela (ed.) 1995. Hildegardis Liber vite meritorum, Turnhout: Brepols. (Corpvs Christianorvm Continuatio mediaeualis, Bd. 92).

    Hildegard & Führkötter, Adelgundis (ed.) 1978. Hildegardis Scivias. Scholars version. Turnholti: Brepols. (Corpvs Christianorvm Continuatio mediaeualis, Bd. 43/43A).

    Hildegard & Moulinier, Laurence (ed.) 2003. Beate Hildegardis Cause et cure. Berlin: Akademie-Verl. (Rarissima mediaevalia Opera latina, 1).

    Hildegard 2010. Physica: Liber subtilitatum diversarum naturarum creaturarum. Textkrit. Ausg. Berlin: de Gruyter.

    Hildegard, Derolez, Albert & Dronke, Peter (eds.) 1996. Hildegardis Bingensis Liber divinorum operum, Turnhout: Brepols. (Corpvs Christianorvm Continuatio mediaeualis, Bd. 92).

     

    Secondary sources:

    Please find a thoroughly researched Hildegard bibliography (incl. the anniversary year 1998) here:

    Lauter, Werner & Aris, Marc-Aeilko (Hg.) 1998. Hildegard von Bingen: Internationale wissenschaftliche Bibliographie; unter Verwendung der Hildegard-Bibliographie von Werner Lauter. Mainz: Selbstverl. der Ges. für Mittelrheinische Kirchengeschichte. (Quellen und Abhandlungen zur mittelrheinischen Kirchengeschichte, Bd. 84).

     

    A selection of secondary sources published since 1999 is provided here:

    Selected Bibliography – Hildegard von Bingen – Monographs since 1999

  • Links